GENERAL THOMAS MALEY HARRIS, USA - History

GENERAL THOMAS MALEY HARRIS, USA - History


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VITAL STATISTICS
BORN: 1835 in Swedesboro, NJ.
DIED: 1864 in Kennesaw Mountain.
CAMPAIGNS: Shiloh, Corinth, Perryville, Stone's River, Chickamauga,
Chattanooga, Missionary Ridge, Knoxville, Atlanta, Kennesaw Mountain.
HIGHEST RANK ACHIEVED: Brigadier General.
BIOGRAPHY
Charles Garrison Harker was born on December 2, 1835, in Swedesboro, New Jersey. He worked as a retail clerk working for Congressman Nathan T. Stratton. Stratton append him to West Point, from which Harker graduated in 1858. After graduating, he served at Governor's Island, New York; and in Oregon and Washington territories. Early in 1861, he began training Ohio volunteers for service in a civil war. A few months after the war began, he became a colonel of the 6th Ohio Volunteers, attached to Brig. Gen. Don Carlos Buell's command. Harker fought at Shiloh, the Siege of Corinth, and the Battle of Perryville. He made a major contribution at the Battle of Stone's River, and took a firm stand at the Battle of Chickamauga. Because of his contribution to the Union effort, he was promoted to brigadier general to date from September 20, 1863. After participating in the Battles of Chattanooga and Missionary Ridge, he helped relieve Maj. Ambrose E. Burnside at Knoxville. Early in the Atlanta Campaign, he led a brigade in the IV Corps. Harker was shot from his horse and killed during the Battle of Kennesaw Mountain, on June 27, 1864.

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General Thomas Maley Harris (June 17, 1813-September 30, 1906) was born at present Harrisville. He rose to prominence after the Civil War, when he served on the military commission that tried conspirators who acted with John Wilkes Booth in the assassination of President Abraham Lincoln.

His book, Assassination of Lincoln: A History of the Great Conspiracy, published in 1892, made Harris a target for critics of the verdict. The main complaint concerned the execution of Mary Surratt, a woman thought by many to have been innocent. However, historians later located a signed confession by George Atzerodt, who was executed July 7, 1865, along with Surratt and two other conspirators. The statement of Atzerodt clearly implicates Surratt in the conspiracy. Her hanging was said to have been the first time the federal government executed a woman.

In his youth, Harris took advantage of limited opportunities for education. As a young man, he began a teaching career at the Parkersburg Institute. He studied medicine at Louisville, where he graduated in 1843.

When the Civil War began, Harris was practicing medicine in Gilmer County. He recruited the 10th West Virginia Infantry Regiment for service in the Union army and, on May 20, 1862, was made colonel of his regiment. Harris was commissioned brigadier general March 29, 1865. He was promoted to brevet major general April 2, 1865, for his part in the Union assault on Petersburg, Virginia.

Harris had always been against slavery. He gave an oration July 4, 1849, in which he attacked slavery on moral and economic grounds, for which he was criticized in the newspapers. Previously a Whig, he joined the new Republican Party about the time of the Civil War. He served in the House of Delegates in 1867, as state adjutant general (1869–71), and was mentioned as a possible candidate for governor.

Harris was once mayor of his hometown of Harrisville. He also served as U.S. pension agent 1871–76. Harrisville, the county seat of Ritchie County and previously known as Solus, was named for Harris in 1895. He died there at the age of 93.

Sources

Conley, Phil, ed. West Virginia Encyclopedia. Charleston: West Virginia Publishing, 1929.

Comstock, Jim, ed. West Virginia Heritage Encyclopedia vol. 10. Richwood: Jim Comstock, 1976.

Bak, Richard. The Day Lincoln was Shot. Dallas: Taylor Pub., 1998.

Harris, Thomas Maley. The Assassination of Lincoln: A History of the Great Conspiracy. Boston: American Citizen Co., 1892.

Matheny, H. E. Major General Thomas Maley Harris. Parsons: McClain, 1963.


Thomas Maley Harris

Thomas Maley Harris (1817–1906) was a physician and Union general during the American Civil War. Born and raised in Harrisville, Virginia (now part of West Virginia), Harris originally set out to be a teacher, but changed career paths to study medicine. He received his medical degree from Louisville Medical College in 1843 and returned to Virginia to practice medicine until 1861, when he closed his practice when the Civil War began. [1]

He was transferred to the Army of the James and took command of a division of reinforcements from the Department of West Virginia attached to the XXIV Corps. He received a full promotion to brigadier general in March 1865 and a brevet promotion to major general for service at the battle of Fort Gregg on April 2, 1865. [3] His troops were among those directly responsible for cutting off Robert E. Lee's line of retreat at Appomattox Courthouse. [2] Following the Confederate surrender at Appomattox, Harris served on the military commission which tried the Lincoln Conspirators. [3] Following the trial general Harris authored two books about the trial evidences and proceedings: Assassination of Lincoln: A History of the Great Conspiracy, Trial of the Conspirators by a Military Commission, and a Review of the Trial of John H. Surratt, 1892 and later: Rome's Responsibility for the Assassination of Abraham Lincoln, 1897.


Thomas Maley Harris

Thomas Maley Harris (1817–1906) was a physician and Union general during the Civil War. Born and raised in Harrisville, Virginia (now part of West Virginia), Harris originally set out to be a teacher, but changed career paths to study medicine. He received his medical degree from Louisville Medical College in 1843 and returned to Virginia to practice medicine until 1861, when he closed his practice when the Civil War began. Ώ]

During the war, Harris commanded the 10th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the Shenandoah Valley, then a brigade and division during Philip Sheridan's Valley Campaigns of 1864. ΐ] He was brevetted to brigadier general for service at the Battle of Cedar Creek on October 19, 1864. Α] He was transferred to the Army of the James and took command of a division of reinforcements from the Department of West Virginia attached to the XXIV Corps. He received a full promotion to brigadier general in March 1865 and a brevet promotion to major general for service at the battle of Fort Gregg on April 2, 1865. Α] His troops were among those directly responsible for cutting off Robert E. Lee's line of retreat at Appomattox Courthouse. ΐ] Following the Confederate surrender at Appomattox, Harris served on the military commission which tried the Lincoln Conspirators. Α] Following the trial general Harris authored a book about the trial evidences and proceedings: Assassination of Lincoln: A History of the Great Conspiracy, Trial of the Conspirators by a Military Commission, and a Review of the Trial of John H. Surratt, 1892.


Thomas Maley Harris

Thomas Maley Harris (1817–1906) was a physician and Union general during the Civil War.

Born and raised in Harrisville, Virginia (now part of West Virginia), Harris originally set out to be a teacher, but changed career paths to study medicine. He received his medical degree from Louisville Medical College in 1843 and returned to Virginia to practice medicine until 1861, when he closed his practice when the Civil War began. [1]

During the war, Harris commanded the 10th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment in the Shenandoah Valley, then a brigade and division during Philip Sheridan's Valley Campaigns of 1864. [2] He was brevetted to brigadier general for service at the Battle of Cedar Creek on October 19, 1864. [3]

He was transferred to the Army of the James and took command of a division of reinforcements from the Department of West Virginia attached to the XXIV Corps. He received a full promotion to brigadier general in March 1865 and a brevet promotion to major general for service at the battle of Fort Gregg on April 2, 1865. [3] His troops were among those directly responsible for cutting off Robert E. Lee's line of retreat at Appomattox Courthouse. [2] Following the Confederate surrender at Appomattox, Harris served on the military commission which tried the Lincoln Conspirators. [3] Following the trial general Harris authored two books about the trial evidences and proceedings: Assassination of Lincoln: A History of the Great Conspiracy, Trial of the Conspirators by a Military Commission, and a Review of the Trial of John H. Surratt, 1892 and later: Rome's Responsibility for the Assassination of Abraham Lincoln, 1897.

After the war, Harris elected to the West Virginia legislature and was appointed an adjunct general in the state militia and the U.S. pension agent for Wheeling, West Virginia. He resumed his medical practice until his retirement in 1885. [1]


Matheny, H. E.

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Major General Thomas Maley Harris: A Member of the Military Commission That Tried the President Abraham Lincoln Assassination Conspirators, and Roster of the 10th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment, 1861-1865 (Classic Reprint)

Excerpt from Major General Thomas Maley Harris: A Member of the Military Commission That Tried the President Abraham Lincoln Assassination Conspirators, and Roster of the 10th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment, 1861-1865

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Forgott Excerpt from Major General Thomas Maley Harris: A Member of the Military Commission That Tried the President Abraham Lincoln Assassination Conspirators, and Roster of the 10th West Virginia Volunteer Infantry Regiment, 1861-1865

In a few instances, a reference is not a direct quotation, but refers to an accurate account of that particular incident.

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David Hunter

Major General David Hunter

David Hunter (1802-1886) was a Union general in the American Civil War. He achieved fame by his unauthorized 1862 order, immediately rescinded, emancipating slaves in three Southern states and later as the president of the military commission trying the conspirators involved with the assassination of Abraham Lincoln.

Hunter was born in Princeton, New Jersey, the cousin of writer-illustrator David Hunter Strother, who would also serve as a Union Army general, and his maternal grandfather was Richard Stockton, a signer of the Declaration of Independence.

Hunter was wounded in the neck and cheek while commanding a division under Irvin McDowell at the First Battle of Bull Run in July 1861. In August he was promoted Major General of volunteers. He served as a division commander in the Western Army under Maj. Gen. John C. Fremont and was appointed as commander of the Western Department on November 2, 1861 after Frémont was relieved of command. That winter he was transferred to command the Department of Kansas and in March 1862 was transferred again to command the Department of the South.

Hunter arrived at Hilton Head, South Carolina, in March 1862. Preparations to retake Fort Pulaski in the Savannah River from Confederates were already underway. Hunter sent a flag of truce to the fort that was immediately ignored. Union troops opened fire on Fort Pulaski on April 10, 1862, and within 30 hours had forced the surrender of the massive fortress.

As the Commander of the Department of the South, Hunter made a pronouncement that caused controversy across the United States. Hunter, a strong advocate of arming blacks as soldiers for the Union cause, issued General Order No. 11, emancipating the slaves in Georgia, South Carolina, and Florida.

General Order No. 11 - HDQRS Dept. of the South, Hilton Head, Port Royal, S.C.

"The three States of Georgia, Florida and South Carolina, comprising the military department of the south, having deliberately declared themselves no longer under the protection of the United States of America, and having taken up arms against the said United States, it becomes a military necessity to declare them under martial law. This was accordingly done on the 25th day of April, 1862. Slavery and martial law in a free country are altogether incompatible the persons in these three States — Georgia, Florida, and South Carolina— heretofore held as slaves, are therefore declared forever free."

Maj, General David Hunter
1862

After General Order No. 11, Hunter began enlisting black soldiers from the occupied districts of South Carolina and formed the first such Union Army regiment, the 1st South Carolina (African Descent),which he was initially ordered to disband, but eventually got approval from Congress for his action. This order was quickly rescinded by Abraham Lincoln, who was concerned about the political effects that it would have in the border states, driving some slave holders to support the Confederacy. (Lincoln's own Emancipation Proclamation was announced in September, taking effect in January 1863.) Nevertheless, the South was furious at Hunter's action and Confederate president Jefferson Davis issued orders to the Confederate Armies that Hunter was to be considered a "felon to be executed if captured."

Hunter served through the rest of the American Civil War. He was also part of the honor guard at the funeral of Abraham Lincoln and accompanied his body back to Springfield in the spring of 1865. Hunter would later become the president of the military commission that tried the conspirators of Lincoln's assassination, in the summer of 1865. He retired from the Army in July 1866. He was the author of Report of the Military Services of Gen. David Hunter, U.S.A., during the War of the Rebellion, published in 1873.

Hunter died in 1886 in Washington, D.C., and was buried in Princeton, New Jersey.

Eicher, John H., & Eicher, David J., Civil War High Commands, Stanford University Press, 2001.

Foote, Shelby The Civil War, A Narrative: Red River to Appomattox, Random House, 1974.

Warner, Ezra J., Generals in Blue: Lives of the Union Commanders.


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Comments:

  1. Bradey

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  2. Jayvee

    It's just the conditionality

  3. Daman

    Here so history!

  4. Yashvir

    For your information, this has already been discussed many times and has always caused heated discussions, but no sensible consensus has been found. Clarify your thoughts for readers



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